You Must Drive Your Own Determination to Recover From a Stroke

Drive & Determination

From Bruce Dobkin MD (Video below)
Edited by Barbara Gabogrecan

A stroke is caused by impaired blood flow or bleeding on the brain; the latter makes up 10-15% of strokes. When you suffer from a stroke, localized tissue in the brain is injured. This can lead to a number of problems, including:-
paralysis
inability to swallow
finding/recalling words
speech impairments
loss of sensations etc.

One concern stroke patients have is the fear of having another stroke. You and your doctors, need to be aware of the risk factors e.g. irregular heart beat (atrial fibrillation), diabetes, and blood pressure. You also need to be aware that some Cholesterol medication can affect the hips and leg muscles. Many stroke victims also suffer from depression. This is a common response to a stroke, with around 50% of stroke victims experiencing depession.

If your hands are affected (unable to grasp with them or open the hand) and there is no improvement over a period of a month, then there is every chance that this may never improve.

If you have been affected with words e.g. comprehending words from others or finding your own words, then you will have to work hard to re-train the brain. It does not matter how much help you receive (outpatient therapy is important), the bottom line is that you must drive your own determination to improve.

You do tend to plateau after 3-4 months, but it is very important for you to continue setting yourself goals to keep up the improvement. Your caregivers are also important; they are also suffering, but are always trying to make you feel positive and strong. Don’t forget, as you do improve, it is important to think of their needs too.

Hints and Tips
Don’t think ‘why me’? after all….why not you? These things happen and if we waste our energy on negative thoughts, you are less likely to improve. Now is the time for you to be determined and pull on your inner strength to help you through your recovery. Accept who you are now, not who you were or who you might be in the future.

Video
The information in this video is from Bruce Dobkin MD and edited by Barbara Gabogrecan

These videos are used under the You Tube Public Licence agreement

29 thoughts on “You Must Drive Your Own Determination to Recover From a Stroke

  1. james

    I love your advice about not dwelling on why me. This is so true, wasting negative energy on feeling sorry for yourself can get in the way of the healing process and can only hurt a person’s recovery.

    Reply
  2. Mike Teberio

    I really do believe in this because you have too have your own will power and determination too get better if that is what you really want but in some cases people can’t change what already has been done . So i mean every person should get a chance at recovery but that’s just not how it works so i mean your tips and hints are great can’t wait too hear more !!

    Reply
  3. Debbie Boulier

    In the first few weeks it can be hard to not have negative thoughts and feeling, but draw on the network of people that are out there to help you. Once you start seeing some improvement those negative thoughts will melt away.

    Reply
  4. Austin

    Self Determination and self affirmation are truly the keys to recovery. Great article with some great messages.

    Reply
  5. Will McCaig

    I like your hints and tips. A positive attitude goes a long way. i know too many people who sit there feeling sorry for themselves. they have in some ways already admitted defeat.

    Reply
  6. Ben McKinnon

    This article reminds me of the old adage “mind over matter”. It’s really applicable to help with sickness, as well as all other negative things. You’d be surprised what kinds of progress you can make by looking forward to a better tomorrow and leaving all the negativity behind.

    Reply
  7. Chris W.

    I agree that your own positive mindset and determination are key to recovery from a stroke or anything setback you encounter in life. While is is hard to get out of depression, it is essential to overcome it and focus on the positive.

    Reply
  8. Ana B.

    I completely agree with the tip for those who are affected by strokes to not focus on what could have been, and instead focus on how they are and how they can improve and recover. No need dwelling on the past.

    Reply
  9. S.B. Stolk

    This is so, so important, not just for strokes but for any serious illness. Having a ‘can-do’ attitude makes all the difference in recovery.

    Reply
  10. Fred Arnold

    My uncle had a lot of strokes due to a large tumor in his head. It was awful! But he still was the happiest guy I had ever met. I swear his happiness gave him to live three years past what they predicted. It really is mind over matter!

    Reply
    1. Barbara Gabogrecan Post author

      How wonderful he must have been. Probably tough for his loved ones but I guess he gave you all strength too. Barb

      Reply
  11. arsuk

    Yeah i feel this too because the article is all about the good determination to recover from a stroke. So keep sharing this. This has many facts that need to be known by most of the people who have faced a serious illness.

    Reply
  12. jinie lara

    It was awful! But he still was the happiest guy I had ever met. I swear his happiness gave him to live three years past what they predicted. It really is mind over matter!.This is so, so important, not just for strokes but for any serious illness. Having a ‘can-do’ attitude makes all the difference in recovery.

    Reply
    1. Barbara Gabogrecan Post author

      How wonderful to have your relative so positive; it would not only have helped him, but you too I would think. I am sorry for your loss, but so pleased to know that you remember him in such a way. Barb

      Reply
  13. Danny

    Although a stroke can be very scary, it does leave a person a lot to think about and a lot to learn from. Having one only implies that you are truly human and that you can’t be exempt. Just like any other illness or disease, having a positive attitude is the first step to garnering a recovery.

    Reply
  14. ashi

    One of my teachers suffered from a tumour but he was alive and happy with his life and was one of the most wonderful people i have met. Happiness is so helpful when suffering from an illness, and it can come when u fully understand your illness.

    Reply
  15. Jane

    Thanks for the article. An elderly relative of miner recently had a stroke. I am assisting them with the recovery process. At first they could not accept they had almost died but now they are determined to change their lifestyle habits.

    Reply
    1. Barbara Gabogrecan Post author

      I wish your friend the very best Jane. I think one of the reasons why it is difficult to accept the severity of a stroke is that the patient often does not feel anything! I know I actually thought it was a waste of time even being in hospital – then I discovered that I could not read and that really upset me; but it also made me determined to figure out how to manage my life with this affliction. The brain feels no pain and does not realise that anything has happened – that is why it is so important for others to recognise the symptoms of a stroke so they can get help quickly for the patient. Barb You can read what happened to me and how I coped (I also had a brain tumour) in my book Thank God I Had a Stroke. Barb http://gabogrecanstrokerecovery.com/buy-now.html

      Reply
  16. Brandon A

    Your advice is both spot on and fantastic. Anyone at any time can be struck with the bad luck of a stroke. There’s no sense in wasting time dwelling on it and feeling sorry for yourself. Focus all your time and energy on your recovery, not your past.

    Reply
  17. Raul

    This is so true , stroke is the harsh reality which someone can face in their life. positive attitude and the identifying risk is the key to get up and fight with it

    Reply
    1. Barbara Gabogrecan Post author

      Thanks for letting me know Sandra – as I cannot read since my stroke, I cannot see if I have written anything wrong – thank goodness I can still write – what I have is a rare condition known as Alexia without Agraphia

      Reply
  18. phurwa sherpa

    My uncle had a lot of strokes due to a large tumor in his head. It was awful! But he still was the happiest guy I had ever met. I swear his happiness gave him to live three years past what they predicted. It really is mind over matter!

    Reply
    1. Barbara Gabogrecan Post author

      What a wonderful uncle you had – he learned to accept what was happening to him and did not allow it to destroy his life. What a wonderful legacy for you to remember him by.

      Reply

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