When Recovering From Illness, Support is Everything!

supportI have received some fantastic, warm comments in this blog which, in their own way have helped to speed up my recovery. I have decided that I would take one of these comments (by Nicole Evans) and discuss with readers some of the issues raised.

First of all, thank you Nicole for the wonderfully supportive comments that you have made. As my main purpose in writing the book, the blog and undertaking speaking engagements is to share with others the fact that there is still a great life to be had after a serious illness. The fact that you felt that I am “such an inspiration and so generous!” makes me realise that what I have to say can be of assistance.

Thank you Nicole for this comment: “I love coming (to your Blog) and reading about you, your business accomplishments and, most of all, the tips you share to make a better life.” It is great to know that folk are coming to the Blog over and over again and are gaining something positive from the tips that I provide.

These tips are based on what I found to be so helpful to my recovery. It must be hard for anyone who does not find it easy to be positive and are wasting so much of their precious time on being angry about the trauma they are experiencing. All I can say to these folk, is to try to be positive – every time a negative thought come to your head, mentally push it away and replace it with something that is wonderful (even if it is just a great memory that you have). Do this often enough and eventually you will begin to feel differently.

When my father committed suicide I was really distraught. Every time I thought of him, I broke down. But I had to be strong to look after my semi invalid mother (who, of course, was also in shock) – I was also a single parent with two young children and had to hold down a job as well as look after the family. So I made a decision that every time I thought of my father I would push him from my mind and think of something completely different. Over the next year I was able to cope using this method and then, gradually, I was able to remember the good times that my dad and I shared, without concentrating on the horror that we all had to face and live with.

I find, that what you share, not only benefits people who face severe illness as you did, but also to those of us who live with depression, anxiety and other non life threatening conditions.” Your comment here captures what I have been striving for. All illness is serious to those suffering it, even if it is not life threatening. All have to learn to cope with their illness and if they can be positive and concentrate on finding a path to happiness and fulfilment.

For me, being able to run my three businesses (though somewhat slower and in slightly different ways) was great therapy. Writing a book, building websites, completing painting orders from my online catalogue (and now, working on paintings for an exhibition) all went a long way in ensuring not only my recovery, but my happiness and sense of fulfilment.

How true you next comment is: “All too often, it is the self esteem that takes the biggest knock and to read that you managed to not only give to people so freely but also run a business after your stroke is the biggest inspiration I could think of.”  Yes, we all suffer from loss of self esteem. Our confidence is shot and we have to recognise and accept that this is happening to us. But then we have to push the boundaries and build that confidence back up. Again, by being able to complete the challenges I set myself gradually did build my confidence and made me more able to accept the disabilities I had been left with.

It is very important that we realise just how wonderful our caregivers are. They tend to be forgotten as everyone concentrates on what we (the ill ones) are personally going through. But it is often the strength and love of our caregivers that can make our journey to recovery that much more successful. When recovering from illness, support from your caregivers is everything!

If by sharing my story and letting readers know how I coped with my challenges, inspires them to tackle their own problems in a slightly different way, then I have truly accomplished what I set out to do.

Hints and Tips

Accept all the care and love that is shown to you as a positive pathway to your recovery. Set yourself one or more huge challenges and concentrate on meeting them; you will feel so much more confident and in control of your life if you do this.

57 thoughts on “When Recovering From Illness, Support is Everything!

  1. Debbie Boulier

    It’s great to have help during a stroke recovery, but it can also be very frustrating. Try your best to accept it and realize that it’s only temporary. The helper is there to help you overcome obstacles.

    Reply
  2. james

    This is an amazing article. I love the idea of taking all the love and support of those around you as a big postive as you move forward.

    Reply
  3. Mary McKinney

    Once we knew my son had beat his cancer the road to recovery was the most joyful time of my life. Every day, when I see him I am thankful for the gift of having him still in my life.

    Reply
  4. Mina Gould

    Totally agree that sharing time with loved ones and being grateful paces the way for a speedy recovery! Partnered with sound medical advice, medical technology, and beneficial drugs, you’re going nowhere but up!

    Reply
  5. Mitica

    My father always said do not despair! Trust! Somebody up there loves you … A very great article!!!!

    Reply
  6. jhonnymartin

    ‘Health is wealth’ a well known proverb. Whenever you recovered from any sort of illness you must participate again in kind to support others

    Reply
  7. Isar Bahar

    Accepting all the love and attention is a great way to boost your health but so is being grateful and giving back. Definitely do as much of these as you can and you’ll be back to your awesome self in no time!

    Reply
  8. Ana B.

    I agree that support is essential. You’d be amazed by how much easier and quicker recover is when you accept the support and help of family and friends.

    Reply
  9. Lisa Perkins

    I Absolutely Appreciate and Admire You so much, especially on your “Look-Out” on the world… You have been through quite a bit, but Your attitude & Humor never let it show. I definitely consider You one of my biggest HEROS….!!!

    Reply
  10. Mike Teberio

    I will totally agree on this when you are suffering from an illness and going through rough times you always need someone there helping you and who would support you in those many ways. Can’t wait too read up on more !!!

    Reply
  11. arsuk

    We know the positive thinking is half the battle when treating an illness. So we should support ill people and encourage them to think more positively during the time of their illness. Positive thinking works as medicine. So we must all support those suffering and keep their feelings and thinking in a warm place.

    Reply
  12. Will McCaig

    those tips and hints are very helpful. judging by how people react will really tell you how much you are loved. People will open up. I agree. take it all in.

    Reply
  13. Austin

    Support can truly be the best medicine, and this article definitely validates that. No matter who you are, care and attention will always lead you on the road to recovery.

    Reply
  14. Austin Y

    I definitely agree that love and support are the greatest forms of medication you could have. It’s very important to allow people in and help you recover. Great article.

    Reply
  15. james

    This is great insight. I imagine sometimes that people who are used to being independent and doing everything on their own get frustrated and maybe upset with all the help they get after a health issue. I think as you stated, it’s very important that they take time to realize that all the support and love they get should be taken as positive and helpful on the road to recovery.

    Reply
  16. steven san

    It is a different statement. It’s great to have help during a stroke recovery, but it can also be very frustrating. Try your best to accept it and realize that it’s only temporary. The helper is there to help you overcome obstacles.Totally agree that sharing time with loved ones and being grateful paces the way for a speedy recovery! Partnered with sound medical advice, medical technology, and beneficial drugs, you’re going nowhere but up!

    Reply
  17. Kate Mumble

    Support is so important after a stroke or any other kind of serious illness and injury. A few years ago I helped my mother-in-law after a stroke and she said she don’t think she could have coped without the support of her family and friends. Being alone scared her more than dealing with the stroke.

    Reply
  18. dee lee

    I agree setting challenges is a great way to get through rough times.
    I find nothing more satisfying than seeing hard work pay off.
    great advice.

    Reply
  19. Nexus_Guy

    Support really is needed after serious illness experience. I once knew someone who suffered from stroke and really needed people’s support otherwise they were contemplating to take their life. Great article, it really gives an insight in these issues.

    Reply
  20. S.B. Stolk

    It can be so hard to reach out for support when you’re recuperating. Our culture tells us that being ‘strong’ or ‘capable’ means not ever needing help but the truth is we all have times when we do. Thanks for sharing your personal journey!

    Reply
  21. Fred Arnold

    Good job, and keep trucking along! It definitely helps to have the support of your friends and family and even those randomly over the internet! It helps keep a sound mind and when your mind is happy your body is as well!

    Reply
  22. Joe Myer

    My grand dad when he had his stroke had issues with coping. He needed help with everyday functions which he did not take willingly. He was set in his ways and was one of the do it yourself types so he had to really be watched. Poor guy.

    Reply
    1. Barbara Gabogrecan Post author

      It is sad when folk will not accept the help they need. It is tough for them and their loved ones.

      Reply
  23. james

    Thanks to GOD, who saved you.Dont stop hare,Make confident and look about your health that it won’t come again.

    Reply
  24. Matt R

    You are such an inspiration! I’ve always felt that the more positive energy you put out into the world, the more you’ll receive in return and I think your story is perfect evidence of this.

    Reply
  25. Brandon A

    Very inspiring piece! Accepting the love and support those closest to you give you is essential in aiding in a successful recovery. Fantastic piece of advice!

    Reply
  26. Simon

    You mention replacing negative thoughts with positive ones; mindfulness meditation is an amazing way to train your mind and gain much greater control over your thoughts. With practise, you can reach a point where negative thoughts have vastly less impact on your emotional state.

    Reply
  27. Tim Browne

    Just like you said, life should be all about meeting goals. Meeting goals empowers us and lets us know that we control our own destiny. This is no different when recovering from a stroke or illness. Wonderful advice.

    Reply
  28. Chris W.

    I love how you emphasize the positive! It is nice to know that in the face of a serious illness or personal tragedy that one can still find joy and happiness. You are truly an inspiration!!!

    Reply
  29. Sasha

    I love how positive you try to be even though you know how hard it is. You make overcoming challenges seem possible and structured to real life where others try to empathize and give unrealistic advice. Your genuine feelings are greatly portrayed by your words. Thank You!

    Reply
  30. Jane

    We all need a strong support when recovering from an illness. Can easily feel isolated and in a state of despair when alone. Great article.

    Reply
  31. karen10101

    You hints are so true. If you set a goal, and make steps to achieve it, you will eventually get there; and feel good on the way.

    Reply
  32. Raul

    It is very important to be confident and fight with yourself, as explained above your will power and determination will make you stand up and help you fight will all the odds.

    Reply
  33. Jane

    Inspirational article. Must be reassuring that there is an increasing number of visitors to the blog. At times having a chronic illness can make someone feel rather isolated and would welcome company.

    Reply
  34. Mimi Hanson

    This was a great read and really hit close to home. I wish I had read this before my father’s stroke.

    Reply
  35. Demond Bivins

    This article was a great read now one in my family have not had a stroke yet but right now my mother is struggling with her weight and sometimes she have heart problems. Reading your article made me think about spending more time with my mother before this gets worst I’ll think go visit her this weekend

    Reply
    1. Barbara Gabogrecan Post author

      I hope your mum is able to improve on her weight and that you are able to support her (and that she will accept your help) – somehow weight does not seem to be a live threatening problem – yet it is! I am pleased that my post has given you the strength to make a change – and I want you to know that your comments have also inspired me, as I too suffer from a weight problem. My son has lost 40kilo and it is great to see the change in him. I have around 20 kilo I could lose – so as of today I will try even harder! Thank you Demond. Barb

      Reply
  36. drew moore

    Support can truly be the best medicine, and this article definitely validates that. No matter who you are, care and attention will always lead you on the road to recovery.

    Reply
  37. Kevin Duan

    Really nice article! This will really help support me and my family as we go through stroke recovery.

    Reply
  38. Shelley T

    My mother had a mini stroke when she was in her late 50’s. That mini stroke actually saved her life!

    Reply
    1. Barbara Gabogrecan Post author

      My husband’s sister had over 200 mini strokes. She lived on her own and was unfortunately an alcoholic, so the family thought her behaviour was due to the alcohol – not the stroke.

      Reply
  39. ryan

    It is such a lonely time and the support of your family is the best medicine, without my son standing by me all the way i dont think i could have been able to cope with life after my stroke

    Reply
    1. Barbara Gabogrecan Post author

      Strangely, you often do not feel anything when you have a stroke. A friend of mine got up in the middle of the night to go to the toilet and found the door jammed and he could not open it. He called his wife to help open it and she discovered that his right arm was paralysed as he had just had a stroke – yet he didn’t even realise that was what was happening!

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.