How Slow is Recovery After a Stroke?

Hippocrates forst to diagnose

Hippocrates (Classical Greek physician) from Wikipedia

Information from video below
Edited by Barbara Gabogrecan

The good news is that around two thirds of stroke victims do make a degree of recovery, but the process is long and can be very frustrating. The hardest thing for the stroke victim and the caregivers to cope with is the emotional impact on their lives.

The brain controls everything we do. For the brain to work properly it needs a constant supply of blood. If this supply is stopped, even for a very short period of time, part of the brain will be damaged; this is called a stroke. There are two types of strokes; one is caused by a blockage of the blood vessel, the other is caused by a burst blood vessel.

A ‘CT’ Scan allows the doctors to see just what part of the brain has been damaged by the stroke, then a number of specialists work together as a team to help the patient recover. These specialists include doctors, nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, clinical psychologists and dieticians.  Hippocrates (a classical Greek physician) first diagnosed sudden paralysis – which would have been caused by a stroke.

A stroke can occur at any time to folk of any age. There has even been a case of a baby in the womb suffering from a stroke. In fact, one person every five minutes suffers from a stroke in England. The physical impairments can be quite varied, from mobility, speech, reading and writing, concentration, swallowing etc. There is a real problem of stroke victims suffering from depression as they work towards recovery.

The caregivers are usually the loved ones and it can become very difficult for them to look after those recovering from a stroke. In my opinion, the caregivers are the ‘forgotten generation’ – all efforts tend to concentrate on the sufferer. Caregivers often feel that they have lost a loved one e.g. husband or wife and have simply become a nurse. It takes courage and great determination from both the sufferer and the caregivers, for a stroke victim to recover.

It is very important that the patient receives assistance very quickly, as this can diminish the problems they will face. I know a woman who (when eventually she saw a doctor) it was estimated, had suffered over 200 mini strokes. She lived on her own and was an alcoholic, which delayed the diagnosis. Unfortunately it was too late to save her and she deteriorated quickly.

Tips and Hints

Be aware of the FAST method of recognition of a stroke.
F – does the face show any drooping;
A – arms – can they lift both arms above their head;
S – speech, is it impaired or slurry;
T – time is very important

The Stroke Foundation promotes the FAST message – you can find much more information on strokes at http://strokefoundation.com.au/

Tips and Hints

As soon as you are able, either you or your caregiver should contact an appropriate association, like the Stroke Foundation of Australia. They will assist you in every way that they can and this additional support can be very important to helping with your recovery. They will also advise on how to prevent future strokes.

Video

This video shows how hospitals in England are set up to handle stroke victims. There is some very useful information shared.

29 thoughts on “How Slow is Recovery After a Stroke?

  1. james

    I really took this article to heart. I’ve always been worried about a potential stroke. I have never heard that FAST acronym before and will commit to my memory. I knew about drooping of the face and slurred speech, but was unaware about the tip about being able to lift both arms above your head in the case of a stroke. I honestly think this article may save a life.

    Reply
  2. caitlin

    Great information. Recovering from a stroke is never easy. Contacting the right association can help tremendously.

    Reply
  3. Ana B.

    You’re right that recovering from a stroke can be a long and difficult process but contacting an association and getting the appropriate help can make things that much easier to deal with.

    Reply
  4. sarah keating

    Agreed. It is so important to get every form of outside help that you can from trained professionals like the ones at the Stroke Foundation of Australia.

    Reply
  5. Jennifer Merkley

    It is nice to know that there is so much help out there. Obviously understanding FAST will save lives. Thanks for the information.

    Reply
  6. Chris W.

    I would agree that it is critical for a stroke victim to get help quickly to minimize the damage. I can also sympathize with the caregivers; it must be very hard for them to care for their loved ones. I am glad that there is support out there for both stroke victims and their caregivers.

    Reply
  7. Debbie Boulier

    Thank goodness there are foundations and medical help out there for stroke victims. It can be a long road to recovery and there is a lot of help out there when recovering. Also learning how to avoid any future strokes is very important and once the ill person is able should be taught.

    Reply
  8. Karen Payton

    A lot of countries don’t have such wonderful organizations such as Australia’s Stroke Foundation and to those who are able to avail of it definitely should. I mean, that’s what they’re there for! Reach out and the helping hand will be there.

    Reply
  9. Mike Teberio

    All of these foundations are really great because they help out all these desperate people dealing with this kind of illness and there is so much do be done and i’m glad people are helping these people out because honestly they need all the help they could get !!!

    Reply
  10. udaykumar

    This post will definitely help me identify the stroke and the FAST method is the best way suggested till date.

    Reply
  11. jinie lara

    Thank goodness there are foundations and medical help out there for stroke victims. It can be a long road to recovery and there is a lot of help out there when recovering. Also learning how to avoid any future strokes is very important and once the ill person is able should be taught.

    Reply
  12. Chalene

    It’s incredible to realize how many people a day take a stroke! The numbers have never seemed that high to me, or I have never really paid attention to it, it does however make me curious as to if there is any preventative measures that you can take against having a stroke. Or if people with a certain lifestyle are more likely than not to have a stroke.

    Reply
    1. Barbara Gabogrecan Post author

      There definitely are preventative measure e.g. have your blood pressure checked regularly as high blood pressure can bring on a stroke. Check with the Stroke Foundation if you want to know more.

      Reply
  13. Austin

    Some great hints and tips. Having the right connections like the Stroke Foundation and having the skills for prevention are keys to recovery and future problems.

    Reply
  14. Carolyn Lee

    Everyone’s recovery would be different I am sure. But all in all I think the the speech part for my Dad was the worst. This is Great information to pass along!

    Reply
    1. Barbara Gabogrecan Post author

      Not being able to speak or swallow and being paralised are all such severe and difficult situations to face; my heart goes to these folk and their carers. Barb

      Reply
  15. S.B. Stewart-Laing (@sbstewartlaing)

    Glad that the ‘tips’ section included a reminder to seek out expert organisations to help with recovery. I think it’s easy when you’ve had a serious illness or injury to avoid reaching out for help.

    Reply
  16. Will McCaig

    I love the FAST tip. having a word like that to remember those steps really helps. my parents are getting on in age and need something handy like that to remember certain things. this blog really helps them. thank you

    Reply
  17. Fred Arnold

    My father had a stroke and it was definitely a hard road to recovery. There was a lot of hospital visits due to smaller strokes that kept bringing him a step back but after some time and patience he’s finally living his life again!

    Reply
    1. Barbara Gabogrecan Post author

      I am so pleased to hear of your dad’s recovery. His determination and the patience of his loved ones would no doubt have helped. Barb

      Reply
  18. Mona

    Excellent article, and you are correct. Support is vital to the stroke-victim’s recovery. Support both at home, and from the outside, from other who have suffered the same, can make a complete difference in the success of recovery. Thank you for sharing.

    Reply
  19. Michelle Kafka

    Again informative article. I like that you included some stats and history. I also like that the FAST acronym is directly below the Tips And Hints section for emphasis. Great video.

    Reply
  20. Jane

    Fantastic article. My relative was admitted to a rehab hospital after having a stroke. Recovery is highly dependant on the person. If they do not have other pre existing illnesses they might be able to recover a lot faster than other people who have been diagnosed with chronic complaints.

    Reply
  21. Karen Rumps

    It’s great to know that there is something out their to help encourage stroke victims back onto their feet.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.