How Does a Stroke Effect You?

This can depend on a number of issues:- Stroke Effects* Type of Stroke
* Location of blocked or burst arteries
* Which area of the brain is damaged
* How much brain tissue is permanently damaged
* Your general health before a stroke
* Your level of activity before a stroke

Some of the problems you may experience:-

  1. Weakness in one side of the body
  2. Controlling or co-ordinating movement
  3. Difficulty in receiving messages from one or more of – smell, touch, taste, sight, hearing
  4. Difficulty with language, reading and writing
  5. Difficulty with talking
  6. Swallowing
  7. Thinking and memory
  8. Vision and perception
  9. Recognising one side of your body or the environment
  10. Difficulty in controlling bladder and bowels
  11. Emotional distress (anger, frustration, grief, depression)
  12. Fatigue
  13. Difficulty (mental or physical) having sexual relations
  14. Not wanting to eat or drink
  15. Behaviour and personality changes

Hints and Tips A stroke may only affect one of the 15 problems listed. I have been left with poor balance and I cannot work out anything to do with numbers. But the most distressing problem I had was not being able to read. But my silver lining was that I could still write logically and correctly. It is so important for you to accept what you can do and concentrate on that and not fuss over what you cannot do. Of course you keep trying to improve (I am learning to read again, one word at a time) but it is important to keep up with the skills you do have and become even stronger with them.

You can get the book ‘Thank God I Had a Stroke’ and learn how I coped with both a stroke and a brain tumour http://gabogrecanstrokerecovery.com/buy-now.html

27 thoughts on “How Does a Stroke Effect You?

  1. Debbie Boulier

    This is why suffering from a stroke is so debilitating and devastating. The ability to do some things you love is gone, and that is so sad. Try over and over to bring it back and maybe you’ll be able to, but you will get satisfaction from doing things that weren’t affected.

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  2. james

    This is great advice. I often fear a stroke and am constantly on look out to see if I am displaying any symptoms. It’s amazing that you are learning to read again. I wish you a tremendous amount of luck in your efforts.

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  3. Chuck Garrett

    I learned recently that stroke in middle-aged and younger men is occurring more often. I’m definitely going to check this out. I appreciate your list and tips to educate myself further.

    Reply
    1. Barbara Gabogrecan Post author

      That is correct – younger folk are suffering from a stroke, even teenagers. I met a lady whose 6 month old granddaughter had a stroke and I know of a baby having a stroke while in the womb. No-one is safe – though the older you become the greater the risk. Barb

      Reply
  4. Austin

    A very insightful article with some really great underlying messages. Mastering the skills you know is definitely the way to go!

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  5. Mona

    Wow – what an ordeal – thank you so much for writing these articles to help others. Recognizing a stroke for what it is – as early as possible – is vital to reducing the damage. It can even save a life. Thanks for writing, and best of luck in your own recovery!

    Reply
    1. Barbara Gabogrecan Post author

      Thanks so much Mona for your good wishes. I am recovering well – though there are a few things I still cannot do e.g. I cannot read BUT I can write…my silver lining!

      Reply
  6. Ana B.

    Thanks for the quick run-through. You’re absolutely right that a stroke can affect different parts of the body, or possibly only one. It does help to focus on what you can do, rather than what you can’t, when you’re trying to recover from a stroke; you’ll be less frustrated.

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  7. Joe Dawson

    Great idea about keeping up with the skills you can still do and not to focus too much on what you may have lost.

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  8. Jane

    Great insight. I was ignorant about strokes. I had no idea how bad it really could be. I will be aware of the symptoms and know what to look for.

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  9. Asok Awa

    It is true that a patient would find great relief sooner if they have quick assistance from medical staff.

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  10. alison

    struggling with stroke can be difficult and I have already heard of cases where one has both speech impediment and difficulty with swallowing.

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  11. Bobby

    Stroke sufferers are affected in many bad ways that is detrimental to the health therefore medical assistance is recommended for situations like those

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  12. Ann Conger

    Thanks for having the courage to share your story. A lot of families for some reason try to hide serious medical problems. My grandfather had a stroke and lost his speech and a lot of motor function. It has been several years and I am glad research and therapy has much improved.

    Reply
  13. David

    Thank-you, I now have some piece of mind. My husbane just had a stroke 2 weeks ago and I am trying to come to terms with it this forum will help me alot

    Reply
    1. Barbara Gabogrecan Post author

      I am not sure where you are, but if there is anything I can do to help you with your husband’s recovery, please let me know. You can reach me directly at Barbara@hbba.biz – just keep in mind, recovery does come, somewhat slowly at first, but it does happen. Barb

      Reply
  14. Rex Smith

    Thanks for the information provided and I really appreciate publishing your story. Anybody can suffer from a stroke and the risk increases with age. What is important to know that when there is no blood supply to a region of the body during stroke, it suffocates and thus is damaged. I hope I don’t get one as I am not that brave.

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  15. JPols

    The list of symptoms is important to know of and more people should be aware of it. That we might not experience them all matters, too, for a correct diagnosis, treatment, and recovery.

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  16. Kayla R.

    It’s a good thing I read this. I need to be aware of the symptoms of the aftermath of a stroke, a lot of these are common things that can be caused by many other factors, which is why it is good to pay special attention. This will help me take care of my grandfather so much better.

    Reply
  17. samuel baek

    Very informative. I would be terrified to even have just one of those side effects. Dealing with such things must be difficult for anyone experiencing these effects.

    Reply

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