Brain Surgery

 

Keep Mind BusyMany people who suffer from brain tumours and other medical problems associated with the brain, are often concerned as to whether or not they will still be able to cope with complex thoughts after brain tumour surgery. To assist you with recovery you must understand what you will be experiencing during and after brain surgery and be determined to fight and win the battle you will be facing. It will also assist you if you are able to be patient and keep your mind busy.

After having a stroke and undergoing surgery to remove a brain tumour, not only did I want to be able to think, take action and communicate affectively, I also wanted to be able to learn new skills and how to apply them to my online businesses. Above all, I still wanted to remain entrepreneurial and think of new ideas and ways to develop existing and new business concepts.

After my trauma I was left with the rare condition of Alexia without Agraphia (sometimes called Word Blindness) which meant I could not read, but I could write. I wondered just what I would still be able to do in regards to running my online businesses, as it seemed to me that everything I did depended on being able to read.

I put myself to the test when I decided to do some online training to improve my skills. When you run online businesses you have to keep abreast of all the constant changes that Google makes. If you don’t keep learning about these changes and adjusting your business websites accordingly, your business will suffer.

When Google introduced Penguin and Panda changes were huge and many large online businesses virtually collapsed because their websites no longer satisfied the criteria that Google now had in place.

I was excited when I realised that not only was I able to understand the training, I was able to adjust my websites accordingly; I was even able to put together an easy to follow training session to help others do the same.

It was important for me to ask for help too. Not being able to read meant that I depended on my husband to read to me. There is software available that converts written text to audio and at first I considered using this. However, I found that gradually I was able to slowly read a few words, as long as I read one word at a time and did not try to read a whole sentence as one usually does. Retraining my brain to read was a huge part of my rehabilitation and I thought that using software may slow down the recovery process as I came to rely on it.

I had to have some patience and take it slowly during my recovery. I also had to make sure my brain was kept active and challenged by recalling old skills and learning new ones. It was indeed a blessing to know that I could still function after surviving two serious illnesses at the same time. Having my book launched in Parliament House Melbourne, by the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Health was an exciting time and a rewarding accomplishment, considering I could not read.

Hints and Tips

Never think of yourself as a disabled person. Concentrate on what you want to do and figure out how to do it. Give yourself time to recover. Be positive, be patient, be flexible and above all, be happy.

22 thoughts on “Brain Surgery

  1. Andres Millard

    “Disabled” has such a negative vibe to it – I agree. I’d like to use other terms where applicable or even think that I was too good prior that I needed an extra challenge. It’s all good. Everything happens for a purpose and with the right mindset, you’re halfway to recovery.

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  2. Nicole Evans

    This post brought back memories from when my big sister had major brain surgery for an aneurysm.. nothing could have prepared us for seeing her after surgery, the staples, the shaved head.. her totally unresponsive.. but with time, she started to wake up, and then, with rehab, she relearned all the skills had lost (walking, talking, feeding, dressing). It was a long road for her and for us as a family, she had a young son (my nephew was only about 9 months old) but, because we pushed her when she was on the brink of giving up, when “im disabled” was said to be more of a challenge, not an excuse, she made it. It IS all in the attitude, though i am not sure i could keep such a positive, upbeat attitude if i were to be faced with your kind of challenge!

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  3. Ana B.

    Great advice — never think of yourself as a victim. Brain surgery is a scary thing to think about, but remaining positive and focusing on recovery can make it at least a bit easier to deal with.

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  4. Kris H

    What an inspiring article. I can only imagine how difficult it is to recover from a brain trauma. Knowing in your head want you want to say or do, but being unable to find the right words or actions to express yourself. Being positive during these times is key. We must be thankful for what we can do and move on positively from there.

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  5. Jack Jargens

    Being patient and giving your self enough time to recover while staying positive, I have got to say are the most important things. Staying positive can be so hard and is usually all I am thinking about when I am recovering.

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  6. Debbie Boulier

    Try and think positively and keep busy if you are able. But most of all be patient with yourself. Healing takes time.

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  7. Jounda Strong

    Thank you for the reminder! You clearly are a demonstration of not giving up on finding a solution! Powerful reminder to stay positive!

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  8. Samantha R.

    You give such encouraging words most people feel when there is a bump in the road they should give up but it just makes us tougher and shows us how much more we can achieve.

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  9. Courtney

    I think the most important tip you gave was to be patient. Nothing comes overnight and it is a very important quality to have in general.

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  10. Michael

    You always have to stay positive about yourself. No matter what you are the main source of happiness and motivation. You need to get yourself going and pump yourself full of positive energy.

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  11. Daniel D

    The software word transcribers always take a couple hours to get used to your speech patterns. But once it’s trained they work pretty good.

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  12. Chris W.

    I would agree that staying active and positive are key to overcoming any challenge. Dealing with adversity and making the best of negative situations often causes us to grow in ways we never thought possible.

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  13. bizarrio

    Your story is truly inspiring and I am glad you always want to test yourself.

    I think you have a very positive attitude and it is evident in this article.

    Reply

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