Caring for Others Speeds Up Your recovery

Dog on bed in hospitalThe last thing we tend to think about when we are ill and in hospital, is how to care for others. However, if you can possibly tell a story, especially if it has a funny edge to it, the more others and yourself will think outside of your actual worries and suffering.

Encourage fellow patients to tell you there story. As in business when you are networking, asking questions of others and actually listening to their story, rather than telling them all about you, makes them feel more comfortable and keeps your mind active and your spirit caring.

While in hospital, I was really interested in what fellow patients had to say. Their stories were often touching and heartwarming. Their family and visitors added another dimension to them and helped me understand them better. All of my concentration on them helped me cope with my own worries.

It may seem like a weird approach, but try it. Thinking of others and caring for them truly does open your soul and males you a better person. When you read what actually happened to me that landed me in hospital, it is hard to imagine that I would think of others in my time of crisis. But I did and I am sure it speeded up my recovery as I thought less about my problems while I was thinking of others.

It is well documented that animals will help ill and elderly people cope better with their illness. When my Mum was in a home for the aged for two months before she passed away, I took her little Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, Cameo in to visit her. Cameo popped up on the bed beside my mother who managed to raise one finger and place it on Cameo’s paw. I am sure this gave Mum some feeling of still belonging to the family while she was away from us in the home.

Cameo was not a large dog like the one above ….but nevertheless the dog and patient had a great connection! Thankfully many homes and hospitals will allow the pets to visit patients.

You can read in my book ‘Thank God I Had a Stroke’, of the many times when I was caring for other patients in hospital with me

TIPS AND HINTS
Don’t just concentrate on yourself when in hospital. Consider others around you as well and show them kindness and understanding.

 

32 thoughts on “Caring for Others Speeds Up Your recovery

  1. Peter

    You are so right in what you say. Showing care and concern for others, not only helps them feel better, but also makes you feel better at the same time.

    Reply
  2. Chris W.

    I agree that caring for others really helps you look beyond your own problems. I have always found it to be excellent therapy when I am having problems. I really like your suggestion of comforting ill people with pets. They are such great therapy!

    Reply
  3. Debbie Boulier

    I noticed the dog in the above picture, and animals sure do help all ages when there’s an illness. No matter how sick the person is a cat or a dog always brings a much needed smile to a face. That I truly love to see.

    Reply
    1. stroke_recovery Post author

      Debbie, my mum was in a home for two months before she passed. I took her little Cavalier King Charles dog in to see her. She also lkay on her bed and mum was able to lift a finger and place on her paw. It was so touching.

      Reply
  4. Lisa Perkins

    My dad has always been a “People Person/Extrovert”, on top of it all he was a Salesman for most of his life…. Throughout his recovery in a convelescent home, he really became the guy that would keep people laughing, and smiling…. He sure loved teasing around with the nurses and residents as well. As much as he wanted to be home, I think that they wanted him to stay there Forever!!! Of course, Life was a much better place for him once he was released to come back home….. But, he still goes back for visits (especially to see the Nurses and Aides…) and some residents as well. They always welcome his humor and presence with “Open Arms”!!!!!

    Reply
    1. stroke_recovery Post author

      Lisa, what a wonderful farther you have. I wish I could meet him (out of hospital of course!)

      Reply
  5. Jack

    I have always believed in kindness and understanding with others helps. I have learned over the years that helping other and having understanding with them can greatly help myself and I am glad to see this article out there and influencing others. 🙂

    Reply
  6. Samantha R.

    You never know how it could be until you hear about others pain and it’s always nice to know that your not alone.

    Reply
  7. Ana B.

    I love the way your blog tips center around others and not just yourself — this is a great strategy. By focusing on others you don’t think so much about your own problems and you get better before you know it! 🙂

    Reply
  8. Jane

    Empathy is critical to helping people recover. Makes them feel important. There is nothing wrong with expressing an interest in patients who have a serious illness. They will be grateful for the companionship.

    Reply
  9. Wiliam Caree

    Life is easy and great when we are being helpful other people. We know no man can live alone. So this article will really help people.

    Reply
  10. Gary Roberts

    I agree that making friendships with your fellow hospital patients can be beneficial to all. Just having conversation and sharing life events can lighten the mood and make everyone’s stay less stressful; it is much more pleasant.

    Reply
  11. Jay

    The speed of someone’s recovery depends on the family support. It is always important to have that support system in mind when recovering!

    Reply
  12. Sandra Harriette

    I recall volunteering at an Adult Day Care and it was a really enriching experience. Many of them had amazing stories to tell as well.

    Reply
  13. Tim Johnson

    By helping and be friendly to others you can only make yourself feel better. Plus they will return the favor.

    Reply
  14. caitlin

    I absolutely agree caring for others really helps us to keep our mind off are own troubles and can help to speed up recovery.

    Reply
  15. beth

    more sound advice…i think a visit from a beloved pet would comfort anyone during a lonely hospital stay. definitely helps to not dwell on your own worries, but work to help another.

    Reply
  16. Wanda

    My dad had a stroke several years ago, family support and caring friends helped him along the way. This has touched my heart because it is so true that helping others is valuable.

    Reply
  17. Abbie Dawne

    Remember: there is and always will be someone worse off than you. Reach out to lift their spirit, and your own!

    Reply
  18. rose

    It is true that hearing others and hearing the problems they face makes you put things into perspective. It will keep your mind busy on other things and help others feel better.

    Reply
  19. kris heard

    Amazing advice. People that haven’t spent much time find it odd when we patients worry about others rather than ourselves. When I was incapacitated, my greatest worry wasn’t my own health, but those of my family. Trying to ensure that my mother and father weren’t too stressed out and anxious. When I laughed and joked around with them, I immediately noticed their worry dissipate.

    Reply
  20. Joey E

    I haven’t been in the hospital that much in my life. Knock on wood. But whenever i’ve gone, ive always somewhat tried too get too know my bedmate. I figure if i’m there, its better too be polite, than be a nasty person. Were both don’t want too be there. SO lighten the mood, and just talk.

    Reply
  21. MBW

    It’s important to remember that others around you may need a kind and warming hand, even if its just a listen. To heal oneself, helping others can settle your own well being. It doesn’t hurt to to hear what others have to say, it’s free, why not listen and learn.

    Reply
  22. Sharon

    I agree! It reminds me of what grace is all about, and if you extend it to others you are helping them as you would have wanted someone to help you. Most of us who have had to deal with serious illness ourselves or with family have experienced the range of emotions that come up. The person next to you may be also feeling the same way, and staff is not always available or equipped to handle it.

    Reply
  23. Arshnul

    People who have not spent much time in hospital would find it strange when patients care about others more than ourselves. When I was incapacitated, my biggest concern was not my own health, but that of my family. I tried to ensure that my parents were not too stressed and anxious. When I laughed and joked with them, I immediately realized their concerns dissipate.

    Reply
  24. Arshnul

    Nice post.You are very much truthful about your thinking and about knowledge.Great short task……..

    Reply
  25. Noan Reelie

    I completely agree with you! Just being in an atmosphere of congeniality and kindness can have a great affect on one’s mood which in turn can be helpful for recovery. You probably inadvertently saved some lives during your stay 🙂

    Reply

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