Brain Tumour Alliance Australia and National Stroke Foundation

Adelaide_222_350This week has celebrated World Stroke Day and during the last couple of weeks BTAA (Brain Tumour Alliance Australia) held ‘Hat’ days to bring awareness to their association and to those they care for; sufferers of brain tumours.

Rotary also was promoting mental health awareness with a Hat day (see photo below). As I have suffered from both a stroke and a brain tumour, I want to support both associations. I must admit I did not approach either for the first two years after my illness, but now, as I have made a remarkable recovery, I want to support all groups that are trying to bring awareness and support to those who have suffered from these two life threatening illnesses.

The National Stroke Foundation is asking all of those who have been effected by a stroke (whether they or their loved ones have suffered from this trauma) to lobby the Federal Government for funding for their National Action Plan for Stroke. The number of women suffering from a stroke is greater than the number suffering from breast cancer and the number of men is far greater than the number suffering from prostate cancer. It is definitely time for Government to make a stand and provide the necessary funding.

If you are in Australia and would like to contact your Federal local member, the Stroke Foundation has made it easy. You can simply type in your postcode and the local member and their mailing address pops up. There are even a couple of sample letters that you can use.

The Hat Day that BTAA held was their way to raise some funds and provide awareness. I had a small group of friends join me for lunch and wear a hat (see photo above). We may not have collected a huge amount of money, but at this stage, every small amount helps.

If you want to know more about either of these groups or send them a donation, you can contact them via their websites.

Brain Tumour Alliance – http://www.btaa.org.au/

National Stroke Foundation – http://strokefoundation.com.au/

Adelaide West Rotary Hat day luncheon
Rotary Adelaide West_01

Hints and Tips

Make contact with the appropriate association to help you through your struggles while trying to cope with a serious illness. Don’t be too proud or think that an association is of no value to you. It is a two way street. They may be able to support and help you and you may be able to assist them and those they look after. It is during these tough times that we all need to be aware of the suffering of others, including our family and ourselves.

51 thoughts on “Brain Tumour Alliance Australia and National Stroke Foundation

  1. Debbie Boulier

    I’m actually shocked to hear that stroke among women is more common than breast cancer. Ask for help, that’s what different associations are for and it will also aid you immensely in your recovery.

    Reply
  2. james

    Wow, what a great tip. I never even thought of contacting a local association for all the help and support. I imagine were sometimes so wrapped up in other worries that we forget were to look for help.

    Reply
  3. Mary McKinney

    A support group is one of the number one things you need when dealing with a possible terminal illness. Thank you for your blog.

    Reply
  4. Mina Gould

    Would also recommend joining a support group as you will definitely benefit from sharing experiences with people who understand your position. It’s like facing your challenges with an army! <3

    Reply
  5. Mitica

    It’s nice when you know that some people just have a good heart and would do anything to help sick people, people who create foundations to support sick people deserve respect!!

    Reply
  6. jhonnymartin

    Brain illness is really a very serious problem. It is best if u catch it early and can begin treatment in the earlier stages.

    Reply
  7. Isar Bahar

    I’m no statistician but at least from my part of the woods, there are many social groups tailored to people who share common health challenges and experiences and these are what binds my community together. I agree with Gaby – don’t be a stranger and participate. Learn, share, and recover faster!

    Reply
  8. Ana B.

    The BTAA sounds like a wonderful, helpful organization. I’ve seen it firsthand so I agree that having a support association is a great way to cope with illness and boost recovery.

    Reply
  9. Lisa Perkins

    You are such a Beautiful Strong woman… Each day that I may feel “Down” over everyday Life events, all I have to do is come to your Blog for a sense of “Inspiration” & “Encouragement”. I always walk away with a Smile, knowing that things are going to start looking up Real Soon… You are such an “Inspiration” to many people, I just hope that You don’t Push yourself too Much!!!

    Reply
    1. Barbara Gabogrecan Post author

      Lisa – I have just decided to close one of my businesses (Home Based Business Australia) which was my ‘baby’ and I have run it for over 20 years. But I take your suggestion to heart “don’t overdo it!” I was just not coping well with the workload and I don’t like to do things half heartedly – so it had to close. Thanks for your kind words Barb

      Reply
  10. Mike Teberio

    i have read up on this kind of thing and this has really touched me because i know someone who ha a brain tumour and they had too go through so much because of this and you really tell the whole story i love reading about it thank you so much

    Reply
  11. arsuk

    There is a saying ‘true friends are those who help in the difficult times and laughs in the happy moments’. That sharing during both the good and the bad times is important. Everyone needs support in the difficult time and need friends all the time.

    Reply
  12. Will McCaig

    I agree with the hints and tips. an association really helped me deal with my problem once. Don’t underestimate them.

    Reply
  13. Austin

    A great article with a lot of helpful suggestions. In trying times, an association such as this is really a godsend to anyone looking to cope and find a better relationship with others.

    Reply
  14. Austin Y

    Some more great hints and tips. Joining an organization such as this can really elevate and assist you to a greater place, and most importantly help you cope with your serious illness.

    Reply
  15. james

    This is a great article. I really never considered contacting various medical associations or groups for support when faced with an illness or disease. I’m going to keep this in mind for the future and my own health as well as other around me.

    Reply
  16. Kate Mumble

    Hat Day is such a great idea to raise awareness for these conditions! There are some very good TV adverts here about what to do if someone has a stroke, but events such as Hat Day can get people involved and spread a much wider message.

    Reply
  17. dee lee

    this is a great article. i agree 100%. support groups really helped me out a lot. don’t underestimate the emotional support of others even if they are complete strangers. problems unite people never forget that.

    Reply
    1. Barbara Gabogrecan Post author

      A close observation Dee. Even when I was in hospital and still unable to get out of bed, other patients would share their worries and concerns with me and others as we were all so understanding of the crisis we all were facing and were able to ‘connect’ and open up to each other, It was so helpful and encouraging. Barb

      Reply
  18. Nexus_Guy

    I really appreciate the fact that there are people that are there to help those that are suffering from the illness. The idea of The HAT day will really raise awareness to these issues.

    Reply
  19. James Beeching

    Brain illness is really a very serious problem. My Grandmother had a tumor. It is best if u catch it early and can begin treatment in the earlier stages.

    Reply
  20. S.B. Stolk

    Thanks for sharing! I didn’t know about the BTAA, and I know someone from my secondary school who would benefit from contacting them.

    Reply
  21. Fred Arnold

    This is a cause I would get behind. I am not a sufferer, but if those other ailments have such good government backing, why not strokes as well since more people suffer them overall?

    Reply
  22. Joe Myer

    This organization sounds like a really good idea. Kudos for all your efforts. I’ll definitely look into helping out with this in anyway I can.

    Reply
  23. Matt R

    Great point. Sometimes having a greater perspective above and beyond the day-to-day struggles of illness can be a great comfort and great motivator.

    Reply
  24. Brandon A

    Excellent advice at the end of the post. Much like everything in life, this too is a two-way street like you said. You get what you give. Nobody should be too proud to refuse help from an association with their best interests in mind while recovering from an illness.

    Reply
  25. Simon

    I can only reiterate what others have said: one should *never* be too proud to seek out help and support. Having a group of sympathetic people one can rely on is invaluable to morale.

    Reply
    1. Barbara Gabogrecan Post author

      Sometimes I think that fold do not seek support because they don’t know what is available and how to make contact. I know I received a lot of support once I was aware of who to ask for what. Yet, like you suggest, there are others who simply think that they can manage on their own and do not want support. Barb

      Reply
  26. Tim Browne

    I could not agree more with your advice. Nobody is above accepting help from others, and it’s of no benefit to pretend you are. Accept help from those willing to help you, particularly from an association designed to assist you in your recovery. We can always use a helping hand.

    Reply
  27. Chris W.

    I had no idea that strokes were so much more common than breast cancer. I love how you have public awareness campaigns for strokes in Australia. Here in the States, we have many public awareness campaigns for cancer but very few for strokes. Hopefully, that will change.

    Reply
  28. Sasha

    I am apart of Rotary and would love to get my club to do something that is apart of this organization. I think what you do is amazing and how you do it.

    Reply
  29. Jane

    Sounds like a worthy organisation. I think its needs to be broadcast more so there is a higher level of awareness.

    Reply
  30. karen10101

    Your advice is very relevant. People often don’t take up the support that is offered to them. They need to take these opportunities and let people help them.

    Reply
  31. Raul

    it is very good to know there are certain medical associations out there who are specially skilled to help you out. if you are recovering its always best to contact them for any help you may need.

    Reply
  32. Jane

    I have previously done some voluntary work for Rotary. It is great to support to those who have been diagnosed with a life threatening illness. We used to visit isolated patients who normally did not have any support. This really brightened their day knowing they had someone to talk to.

    Reply
  33. Demond Bivins

    After reading this article it lets me know that you are a very strong woman. The fact that you’ve suffered from a brain tumor and a stroke and made a great recovery without having a mental break down. I’ve never had a brain tumor nor stoke but I’m glad I came across your article.It’s a good thing that you keep in contact with your health association through tough times you have

    Reply
  34. drew moore

    Your advice is brilliant very relevant to me. People often don’t take up the support . They need to take these opportunities and let people help them so they can progress.

    Reply
    1. Barbara Gabogrecan Post author

      I have just been made an Ambassador for the National Stroke Foundation in Australia and go to a training session next week. I am sure that I will have lots to share with everyone and will do so from this blog. Thanks for your enquiry Shelly. Barb

      Reply

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